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D&D 5E – Character Sheet with Dice Rolling

5E – Dice Rolling Character Sheets

The pandemic has made a change to the way I am running D&D games. Running a virtual game of Dungeons and Dragons made me realize how useful it would be if your Player’s Character Sheet would roll your the dice for you. So I took my Character Sheets (you can find then HERE) and figured a way to to add dice rolling. These are my results..

Download a sheet by clicking on the underlined word.

DICE ROLLING Character Sheets: For each class there is a 4 page character sheet: Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard
Class Feature Sheets: These are the same feature sheets that are available on my previous Character Sheets post, repeated here for your convenience. Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard
Simple DICE ROLLING Character Sheet:This is a 2 page character sheet if you don’t need the class information: download it  HERE
Multi-class DICE ROLLING Character Sheet:This has 4 general pages plus an additional 12 pages – one for each class in the Player’s Handbook: download it HERE

Magic Item Record Sheet: The character sheets may not provide enough space to track all of your character’s magic items. If your character requires more space than available on this one page simply copy the file under a different name for each page required. You can scroll the text if the magic item description is too long to fit in the box. If you intend to print the page you should abbreviate long descriptions to fit in a single box, or split the description across two or more boxes. download it HERE

Using the Dice Rollers

I tried several free PDF viewers, and the one that works best with these is Adobe Reader. I recommend you download your Character Sheet and use Adobe Reader to fill it out.

Box by box instructions for filling in the Character Sheets can be found HERE. The only difference is that on these sheets clicking on any red text will generate and display a dice roll.

On the upper right corner of each page there is spot that looks like this  #____   Previously, this is where you could put a version number if you had multiple versions of the same sheet. This has been re-purposed to display the results of any dice roll you may indicate just below that line. For example if you enter 4d12+6 and then click on the red = sign it will roll four 12 sided dice, add them together and add 6 to the total. Above the line it will display the results of that roll. Above that it will show the result of each die rolled. This same space on page 1 is also used to display the results of an ability check, a saving throw, a skill check, or an initiative check. The results of an initiative check will also be displayed in the initiative box. You can override the number in the initiative box by typing in a different number if need be.

The attack bonus box for each weapon will now roll 1d20 and add the attack bonus to the roll. It displays the result of the roll in the same box. There is also an ADV (advantage) and a DIS (disadvantage) box that you can check to roll 2d20 and pick the highest (for advantage) or lowest (for disadvantage) of the two before adding the attack bonus. If a natural 1 is rolled (for advantage two natural 1s must be rolled) it will display MISS in red letters. If a natural 20 is rolled (for disadvantage two natural 20s must rolled) it will display HIT in green letters and will check the CRIT box.

The damage box for each weapon will now roll the indicated number of dice of the indicated size and add the indicated bonus. It displays the result of the roll in the same box. It also shows the results of each individual die roll. If the CRIT (critiacl hit) box is checked the number of dice rolled will be doubled.

For spellcasting characters, clicking on the spell attack modifier (on page 4) will make a spell attack roll and display the results of that roll on the #____ line at the top of that page.

D&D 5E – Magic Item Record Sheet

I have come to realise that my character record sheets (HERE) do not provide enough space to track all of the magic items your character may acquire during your campaign. Rather than adding this sheet to those character record sheets, I am providing this sheet as a separate download. If your character requires more space than available on this page simply copy the file under a different name for each page required.

This is a form-fallible Magic Item Record Sheet for keeping a list with descriptions of your Dungeons and Dragons player character’s magic items.

This was created for use on your monitor during play; you can scroll the text if the magic item description is too long to fit in the box. If you intend to print the page you should abbreviate long descriptions to fit in a single box, or split the description across two or more boxes.

Enjoy!

D&D 5E – Multiclass Spellcasting

There is a lot of confusion regarding how to calculate the number of spell slots you get when you multiclass. This is my attempt at explaining it.

Spells Known and Prepared:
You determine what spells you know and can prepare for each class individually, as if you were a single-classed member of that class.

Spell Slots from the “Spellcasting” class feature:
• Add together all your levels in the bard, cleric, druid, sorcerer, and wizard classes;
• If you have one or more levels in the artificer class, add half these levels (rounded up);
• If you have two or more levels in the paladin class, add half these levels (rounded down);
• If you have two or more levels in the ranger class, add half these levels (rounded down);
• If you have three or more levels in the fighter (eldritch knight) class, add one third these levels (rounded down);
• If you have three or more levels in the rogue (arcane trickster) class, add one third these levels (rounded down);
Use this total to determine your spell slots by consulting the “Multiclass Spellcaster: Spell Slots Per Spell Level” table (PHB p. 165).

Note regarding Warlocks:
Warlocks do not have the “Spellcasting” class feature. Their spells come from the “Pact Magic” class feature. You track warlock spell slots separately from any class with the “spellcasting” class feature. However, you can cast any spell that is available for you to cast form any class using any spell slot of the appropriate level on your list of available warlock spell slots.

D&D 5E – Character Sheet and Instructions

5E Character Sheets – Single Class and Multi-class

Here are my latest Dungeons and Dragons Fifth Edition Character Sheets. They are all available here for free for you to download and use for your next adventure. They can all be printed blank and filled out with a pencil, or you can fill in the forms on your computer and most of the calculations will be done for you. Below the file download area you will find box-by-box instructions on filling these out.

Download a sheet by clicking on the underlined word.

Character Sheets: For each class there is a 4 page character sheet: Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard
Class Feature Sheets: These are separate class feature sheets each of which contains one page for each sub-class for each of the classes in the Player’s Handbook. The information on these sheets is intended as a reminder of the major effects of each of the features. As such, the feature descriptions are abbreviated. Please refer to the Player’s Handbook for the full descriptions. One abbreviation I should explain – When it says (1/rest), that indicates that it can be used one time between a long or short rest. (1/long rest) is one per long rest.: Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard
Simple Character Sheet:This is a 2 page character sheet if you don’t need the class information: download it  HERE
Multi-class Character Sheet:This has 4 general pages plus an additional 12 pages – one for each class: download it HERE

Update #1: 2/4/2020 Revised Druid Character Sheets
Note regarding subclasses: I have tried hard not to include subclass calculations on any of the class sheets. The reason for this is so that they can be used with subclasses that are not in the Player’s Handbook. As a result of this, I have had to make a change to the Druid sheet. On the Druid Sheet, Wild Shape Max CR is no longer Auto-Filled because it varies with the Druid Circle (also called a subclass). They were also calculating the number of Cantrips wrong so I fixed that, and you can also now add a bonus Cantrip to your number of cantrips (for Circle of the Land Druids). A big thank you to Chris for pointing out these problems.

Update #2: 2/13/2020 Revised Fighter Character Sheets
The fighter character sheet was not adding the Proficiency Bonus to the Battlemaster’s Maneuver DC. I revised both the Fighter sheet and the Multiclass Sheet. Thanks Chris.

Update #3: 5/18/2020 Revised Barbarian and Monk Character Sheets
The monk character sheet wasn’t adding the monks wisdom modifier to the unarmored AC. The barbarian’s sheet wasn’t always calculating the unarmored AC correctly. The multclass character sheet wasn’t handling unarmored AC properly for barbarian or monk characters. These should all be working now.

Update #4: 10/1/2020 Revised Paladin Character Sheets
Corrected Spelling error [modifier is typed as madifier]. Thank you Peadee Games for pointing this out.

Filling in the 5E Character Sheets Box by Box

These instructions are for use with the character sheets you can download above. You can print a blank Character Sheet and fill it out by hand using these instructions. If you fill it out on your computer, the boxes that will be filled in for you are shown in red. Information specific to the Multiclass Character Sheet is shown in blue.

PAGE 1

Player: This is you
Campaign: This is the name of the campaign. Ask the DM.
Character Creation Date: The date that you create this character. [Believe me, years from now, when you find this sheet among your old D&D stuff, you will want to know this.]
Current XP: Your character starts off at first level and with 0 experience points. You will be earning experience points as you adventure. Your DM will tell you how many experience points your character earned at the end of each different adventure, and occasionally more often. You can keep a running total here.
Next Level Goal: This is how many experience points you need to advance to the next level. Refer to the table in the PHB. You need 300 points to advance from first level to second level.
CHARACTER
Character Name: This is he name you give to your character. If you can’t think of a name ask the DM for advice. Enter the name you put here in the same box on all of the other sheets.
#____ : Character sheet version. If you make multiple copies of your character sheet enter the version number here. For example, if you print a new copy of your character sheet each time you advance to the next level you may want to put the number 1 here for the first time you print it and change that to a 2 before you print it the next time. Enter the number you put here in the same spot on all of the other sheets.
Race: Enter your character’s race here. The Player’s Handbook (PHB) contains information for all of the standard races; Dwarf, Elf, Halfling, Human, Dragonborn, Gnome, Half-Elf, Half-Orc, and Tiefling. Check with the DM first, he may not have all these races in his campaign world, or he may allow races from other sources.
Class: Each class has its own character sheet. This will be filled in based on the class character sheet you are using; Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock or Wizard. If using the Multiclass Character Sheet go to page 4 to enter your class information. Then come back and enter the combined class/level information here.
Alignment: Your character can be any alignment you choose but your DM may not allow evil aligned player characters. The possible alignments are: Lawful good (LG), Neutral good (NG), Chaotic good (CG), Lawful neutral (LN), Neutral (N), Chaotic neutral (CN), Lawful evil (LE), Neutral evil (NE), and Chaotic evil (CE).
Level: This is your character’s current level. You typically start out at level 1. A character’s level can never exceed 20. If filling this out on your computer, many of the fields on the sheet will be filled in when you enter a number here. If using the Multiclass Character Sheet you will enter this information on page 4. For multi-class characters, the number in this box is the total of all levels in all of your classes. 
Size: This depends on your character’s race. Gnomes and Halflings are small (S), all other standard races are medium (M).
Base Speed: This is the number of feet you can move in one combat round. Dwarf 25 (not reduced by wearing heavy armor), Elf 30, Wood Elf 35, Halfling 25, Human 30, Dragonborn 30, Gnome 25, Half-elf 30, Half-Orc 30, Tiefling 30.
Adjustment to Speed: Enter any adjustments that need to be made to your base speed into the grey shaded area inside the boot. For instance if your character is wearing heavy armor, and his strength score is less than the minimum listed for that armor, his speed is adjusted by -10. Add this number to your base speed to determine your adjusted speed.
Adjusted Speed: This is your base speed modified by any adjustments you may have entered into the boot.
Initiative Modifier: When you roll for your character’s initiative at the beginning of combat, you add this to your initiative roll. Unless you have some feature or ability that affects this, your initiative modifier is the same as your Dexterity modifier.
Initiative adjustment: If some feature of the game grants your character a bonus to his initiative modifier (for example the “alert” feat gives you a +5 bonus to initiative) you can enter a number on the grey shaded area to the left of the word “Dex” below the initiative box. Add this number to your initiative modifier.
ABILITIES
Ability Score: Using a method approve by your DM, determine your character’s ability scores, modify them according to your character’s race and enter the scores in the corresponding boxes. STR for Strength, DEX for Dexterity, CON for Constitution, INT for Intelligence, WIS for Wisdom, Cha for Charisma.
Ability Modifier: For each ability, the modifier is determined by subtracting 10 from the ability score and then dividing the result by 2 (rounding down). Or you can simply look it up on the table in the PHB.
Saving Throws: This is the saving throw modifier for each ability. It is the same as the ability modifier, unless your character is proficient in that ability’s saving throw. This is typically a proficiency you get because of your race.
Saving Throw Proficiency Box: If you are proficient with an ability, check the small box to the left of that abilities saving throw. Add your proficiency bonus (see below) to the ability modifier to get your saving throw modifier.
Saving Throw ad hoc modifier: Enter a number on the grey shaded area to the left of a saving throw proficiency box. Add this number to your saving throw for that ability.
Armor Class: Use the Armor Class (AC) Calculations box on page 2 to determine your armor class. Enter the total armor class from your armor, shield and protective items in the shield.
Hit Point Maximum: This box is where you list your maximum hit points. At first level this will be the highest roll of your hit dice (see below) plus your Constitution modifier.
Current Hit Points: As your character takes damage, he loses hit points. You can use this box to track the damage.
Temporary Hit Points: Some magic spells or other game effects can grant your character what are called “temporary hit points.” You can list these here and track their loss. You lose these before you lose regular hit points. You lose any remaining temporary hit points after finishing a long rest.
Hit Dice Total:  At first level your character has 1 hit die. The hit die type depends on your character’s class; Barbarian d12, Bard d8, Cleric d8, Druid d8, Fighter d10, Monk d8, Paladin d10, Ranger d10, Rogue d8, Sorcerer d6, Warlock d8, Wizard d6. Enter the correct hit die type in the box. The multiclass character sheet has a separate box for each die type.
Available Hit Dice: You receive one hit die each time you advance a level. At the end of a short rest, you can roll one or more of these hit die and, for each die rolled, recover the indicated number of hit points plus your character’s Constitution modifier. You can use this space to keep track of the number of hit die you have left to use for healing. After a long rest, you regain a number of hit die equal to half your total number of them, or a minimum of one hit die.
Death Saves: When you start your turn with 0 hit points you make a death saving throw. You must roll 1d20 and on a roll of 10 or higher you succeed, otherwise you fail. On your third success you become stable, on your third failure you die. A role of 1 counts as two failures. A roll of 20 means that you are no longer dying and you regain 1 hit point. You can use this space to track your progress.
Advantages: List any conditions where you get advantage. For example if you are a dwarf, you have advantage on saving throws against poison.
Disadvantages: List any where you have a disadvantage. For example if your character is small (size S) then you have disadvantage when using heavy weapons.
Passive Perception: This is your Perception Skill bonus modifier +10.
Passive Perception adjustment: If some feature of the game grants you a bonus to your passive (wisdom) perception modifier (for example the “observant” feat gives you a +5  bonus) you can enter that on the grey shaded area to the left of the word “Wis” to the left of the box and enter a number. Then add this number to your passive perception score.
Initiative: When the DM says to “Roll for initiative.” you will roll 1d20 and add your dexterity modifier. This will be your initiative score for this round and determines what order you will act during a combat round. You can enter your initiative score in this area for your reference.
Inspiration: Place a check in this box when you get inspiration. Remove the check when you use it. You either have inspiration or you don’t. Your DM can award your character inspiration, typically for good (or entertaining) roll playing. If you have inspiration, you can spend it to get advantage on any attack roll, saving throw, or ability check. You can give up your inspiration to another character if you think he deserves is.
Proficiency: List your proficiency bonus here. It starts out as +2 at first level and increases as you advance in level.
Exhaustion: You can use this area to keep track of your character’s level of exhaustion. Your DM will tell you when your character is susceptible to a level of exhaustion.
PROFICIENCIES
Skills: Your character will have proficiency in certain skills. For each skill you are proficient in, place a check in the box by that skill. Add your proficiency bonus to the associated ability modifier to determine the bonus you apply to these skill checks. When you attempt to perform a skill that you are not proficient in, it becomes a simple ability check, so enter the ability modifier for that skill’s ability.
x2: There are some class features with double proficiency bonus on some skills, for example, the Knowledge Domain Cleric and Rogue’s Expertise. For each skill that your character has a double proficiency for, put a check in the little [x2] box to the right of that skill name. Double your proficiency bonus and add that to the associated ability modifier.
1/2: A second level Bard gets the “Jack of all Trades” feature. This adds half your proficiency bonus, rounded down, to ability checks you are not proficient in. If your character has this feature, for each skill that your character is not proficient in, put a check in the little [1/2] box to the right of that skill name. Divide your proficiency bonus by 2 (round down)  and add that to the associated ability modifier.
Skill adjustment: If some feature of the game grants you a bonus to a skill  (for example a luckstone grants you a +1 bonus to skill checks) you can enter a number on the grey shaded area to the left of the ability listed to the left of the box. Add this number  to the associated ability modifier.
Saves: List any ability or other saves (such as poison for example) where your character would receive a proficiency bonus to his saving throw.
Tools: If your character is proficient in the use of any types of tools, list them here.
Weapons: List the type of weapons your character is proficient with. If you attack with a weapon that you lack proficiency with, you can’t add your proficiency bonus to damage or to attack rolls.
Armor: List the type of armor your character is proficient with. If you wear armor that you lack proficiency with, you have disadvantage on any ability check, saving throw, or attack roll that involves Strength or Dexterity, and you can’t cast spells.
Other: This is a catch-all for anything that your character has proficiency in that doesn’t fit into any of the other categories.
WEAPON BOXES
There is room to list up to 5 different weapons.
Weapon: On the line to the right of the word “WEAPON” enter the weapon’s type or name. The calculated fields for this weapon will remain blank until you enter some text on this line.
Description: This line is available for you to add additional information about the weapon if you want. For example, you may want to indicate if it is a Light weapon, or list other weapon properties, or what it looks like, or a name.
Reach or Range: Melee weapons have a reach of 5 ft. unless they have the “reach” property and then it becomes 10 ft. Weapons that can be thrown and all ranged weapons have a normal and maximum range.
Damage Type: This will normally be bludgeoning (B), Piercing (P), or slashing (S)
Proficiency check box: If you have proficiency with this weapon. Check this small box.
Proficiency: If you have proficiency with this weapon enter your proficiency bonus in the large box.
Ability modifier to use: Between the words “Proficiency” and “MAGIC” write the name of the ability modifier to use with this weapon. You can click on the down arrow here and select the ability from the drop down list. Most melee weapons use your Strength modifier (STR), and most range weapons use your Dexterity modifier (DEX). If it is a melee weapon with the Finesse property, you can choose to use your Dexterity modifier. If it is a range weapon with the Thrown property, you can choose to use your Strength modifier. Enter the ability modifier for the ability you select into the box directly below in the attack bonus row.
Ability modifier check box: To indicate that you will be using the ability modifier for both attack rolls and for damage put a check in the check box between them.  If you are fighting with two weapons, and this is your second light weapon, you don’t get an ability bonus to damage with this weapon so remove the check between the attack and damage boxes and do not enter the ability modifier for damage. If the box is checked, enter the ability modifier into the box on the damage row.
Magic: If the weapon receives a magic adjustment, enter this in both the attack and damage rows.
Misc. Enter any additional bonuses (or penalties) to attack and/or damage.
Attack Bonus: Add up all the attack adjustments and enter the total here. You will add this bonus to your attack rolls.
Damage Dice: Enter the number and type of die to roll for damage. For weapons with the Versatile property, also ether the damage if the weapon is used two handed. For instance, for a Longsword you could enter 1d8 (1d10).
Damage: Add up all the damage adjustments. You can enter the die number and type followed by the damage adjustment (something like 3d8+4 for example).
Ammo: For weapons that use ammunition, you can use these boxes to check off your ammunition as it is used. If you take the time after a battle, you can normally recover half of your expended ammunition.
NOTES
The section on the lower right of the first sheet is for any notes you may want to add to help you remember details about your character. There may not be enough room here to describe all of his special abilities in detail, but you could list them here and keep the details on page 3, or look them up in the Players Handbook, until you have used them enough to remember how they work. For example, for a first level Dwarf Fighter you might note that he has Darkvision, Dwarven Resilience, Dueling, and Second Wind.
You may want to use separate cards to keep track of information that won’t fit on this sheet. You can use cards available HERE.
If you are filling this out on your computer, there are two non-printing boxes at the bottom of page one.
Update Calculations: All of the information filled in automatically for you should update whenever you make any change. Sometimes it doesn’t. You can press this button to force the form to update all of the calculated fields.
Clear: Be careful to not press this unless you want to erase everything from all of the fields on all pages. If you press it by accident, you may be able to recover the lost information if you press CTRL Z. This button is useful for clearing all fields and starting over, or before printing a blank form to fill out by hand.

PAGE 2

The first page contains everything you may need to reference during combat. The second page contains information about your character’s personality, his physical description, his background and his equipment. The sheet version and character name are duplicated  from page 1.

ARMOR: If your character normally wears armor, list the type of armor here. There are 3 short lines you can use for additional description. Weight: You can enter the weight of your armor here. Put an X in the small box if you do not want to include this weight in “Total Weight Carried” box below the “Other Equipment” box.
SHIELD: If your character normally uses a shield you can list the type here. There are 2 short lines you can use for additional description. You might want to list if it is wood or metal. Weight: You can enter the weight of your shield here. All standard shields weigh 6 lb. Put an X in the small box if you do not want to include this weight in “Total Weight Carried” box below the “Other Equipment” box.

ARMOR CLASS (AC) Calculations
The information in this box is used to calculate your armor class. It is divided into two sections. Each option is in a separate row. Put a check in the circle in the upper section for the type of armor you are wearing and check the circle in the lower section if you are using a shield.  Refer to the table on page 145 in the Player’s Handbook for information regarding specific armor types. After filling out these boxes, add  together the AC for your armor, the AC bonus from your shield and the AC bonus from any Protective Items. Enter that total on page 1 in the shield labeled “Armor Class”

No Armor: Check this row if your character is not wearing armor. Enter your dexterity modifier in the box labeled DEX. If your character is a Barbarian, also enter your constitution modifier in the box labeled CON. If your character is a Monk, also enter your wisdom modifier in the box labeled WIS. Enter any magical or miscellaneous bonus in the appropriate box . Add the contents of each of these boxes and enter that in the box labeled AC.
Light Armor: Check this row if your character is wearing light armor. Enter your dexterity modifier in the box labeled DEX. Enter the armor class from the table in the PHB. Enter any magical or miscellaneous bonus in the appropriate box . Add the contents of each of these boxes and enter that in the box labeled AC.
Medium Armor: Check this row if your character is wearing medium armor. Enter your dexterity modifier, up to a maximum of +2,  in the box labeled DEX. Enter the armor class from the table in the PHB. Enter any magical or miscellaneous bonus in the appropriate box . Add the contents of each of these boxes and enter that in the box labeled AC
Heavy Armor: Check this row if your character is wearing heavy armor. Enter the armor class from the table in the PHB. Enter any magical or miscellaneous bonus in the appropriate box . Add the contents of each of these boxes and enter that in the box labeled AC.
Shield: Check this row if your character is welding a shield. All shields add +2 to your armor class.  Enter any magical or miscellaneous bonus in the appropriate box . Add the contents of each of these boxes and enter that in the box labeled AC.
Protective Items: This is where you can enter up to 2 items your character has, other than armor or a shield, that provides a bonus to you armor class. AC Bonus: Enter the AC bonus this item provides here. Add this to your total AC on page 1. Weight: You can enter the weight of the protective item here. Put an X in the small box if you do not want to include this weight in “Total Weight Carried” box below the “Other Equipment” box.
Other Equipment: For tracking items that your character owns. ITEM: Enter the name of the item in the box on the left. For longer names, you may need to abbreviate.   WT.: Enter the weight of the item in the top portion of this box. Put an X in the small box if you do not want to include this weight in “Total Weight Carried”. For multiple items you can enter the number of items after the “X” and the total weight for all of these items after the “=”Coin Purse: Enter the weight of all of your coins here. To calculate the weight add up the total coins you have (not their value, just the number of coins).  50 coins weigh 1 pound.
Carrying Capacity: This is your Strength score X 15. If some feature of the game provided you with double your normal carrying capacity check the small box labeled “X2” and multiply your Strength score by 30.
Push, Dag, or Lift: This is twice your Carrying Capacity.
Total Weight Carried: Simply add up the weight of everything listed above that isn’t marked to not be counted.
Lifestyle: Your downtime, between adventures, lifestyle can be Wretched, Squalid, Poor, Modest, Comfortable, Wealthy, or Aristocratic. If everyone in the party wants to stay together between adventures they should all have the same lifestyle.
Expenses/day: This depends on your lifestyle. Refer to the PHB page 157.
TREASURE
This area is for keeping track of your character’s monetary and magical possessions. You can track the number of Copper Pieces (CP), Silver Pieces (SP), Electrum Pieces (EP), Gold pieces (GP) and Platinum Pieces (PP). [More information on coins in the post HERE.]
There is a space for Jewels & Gems [More information on gems in the post HERE], Magic items, and Other items.
Magic Item: There are 3 boxes for tracking magic items. Enter the name of the magic item in the space above the box and enter its description in the box. The text will shrink and additional lines will be added as you type. There is a box to check if you are attuned to the item. You can only be attuned to 3 magic items.
PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Age, Height, Weight, Eyes, Hair, Skin: Use the description of your character’s race in the Player’s Handbook as a guide. Gender, Handedness: your choice. There is no game advantage or penalty regardless of your choice. Physical Description: List distinguishing features- scars, tattoos, etc. The text will shrink and additional lines will be added as you type.
CHARACTER SKETCH
Draw a picture of your character in the frame. If you are using Adobe Reader, you can click on the image area and it will pop-up a “Select Icon” menu. You can use this to browse your computer for an image to place in this area. There are many good character sketches available on-line. The image must be in PDF file format. There are free utilities available that you can use to convert image files into PDF format. You may find A character schetch that you like HERE.
Languages: List the languages your character knows in this box. Unless you choose otherwise, your character can read and write any language that he can speak.
The rest of page 2: This is rather straight forward. All of this information is useful in role playing your character. You may want to glance over this whenever you are trying to decide what your character would do in a particular situation. As you enter text into the larger boxes, if you continue to type after you reach the end of a line the text will become smaller and additional lines will be added.

PAGE 3 

Character Background and/or Notes Overflow
This page is for you to use to tell the story of your character. Where he or she came from and why they are here. It can also be used to keep more detailed descriptions of your character’s feats and abilities that don’t fit on the other sheets.

PAGE 4 

Class  Specific Information

Single Class Character Sheet: This page is different for each class. There is a place to enter your sub-class and most of the  information regarding your class that changes as you advance in level. It will calculate Spell Slots, Cantrips Known, Spells Prepared, Spell Save DC, Spell Attack Modifier and other things for each class. It makes no assumptions regarding subclass features so you can use it for subclasses that are not found in official books. It does not provide room for spell descriptions. These are best handled with spell cards, or in some cases a printed spell book (refer to my posts HERE and HERE.) There should however be enough room for more than just the spell name. What I would do is enter a symbol to indicate if the spell is (C) concentration, (R) ritual, or sometimes (T) casting time. There is also room to indicate which book the spell is found in if it isn’t from the PHB. For the Cleric and some others, when you get to higher levels there may not be enough room to list all available spells, but there should be enough room to list all of the spells you might want to use.

Multiclass Character Sheet:  Enter the level for each class and select its subclass. Enter these classes along with their level and the total character level on page 1. Mulitclass Spellcasting: Use the instructions on this page to determine your available spell slots. 
Additional Class Sheets: The Multiclass Character Sheet contains 12 additional pages. There is one for each class. They are identical in most ways to page 4 of the single class sheets. They use the information on the multiclass page 4 for the class level. Classes that have the “spellcasing” feature do not have a “Spell Slots and Castings” box. You will use the one on your page 4 instead.
_____________________________________

The main thing to remember is that the character sheet is yours. Use it in any way that makes sense to you. You can write outside the boxes, use circles and arrows, scribble in the margins, or use it in any way that you choose. Also, you don’t have to completely fill out every box before you start playing. If you never decide on your character’s eye color, it won’t effect the game. [As a DM, I do strongly recommend that you give your character a name before your second gaming session. I have played too many times with one or more “no name” characters. This can be a distraction.]

Here are a couple of tips:
First, use pencil instead of ink. Many things can happen during an adventure that can cause things to change so keep an eraser handy.

Second, if you can cast spells, you might want to use one or more weapon boxes on page 1 for quick reference to your favorite offensive spells. Look at the image at the top of this page for an example.

Third, if you choose to use the Multiclass Character Sheet I recommend you start by using a Single Class Character Sheet until you add a second class. You can export the form data from the single class sheet and import it into the multiclass sheet. Also, if you print the Multiclass Character Sheet, there is no need to print pages for the classes that you are not using.

Now that you have filled out your Character sheet, let the game begin!

D&D 5E – Revised Character Sheets are Coming

This is the first of my newly revised Character Sheets. This one 4 pages and is for Clerics only. You can download it HERE.

UPDATE: The new character sheets are available now. For the most recent auto-calculate Character Sheets click HERE.

I will be posting all of the new character sheets in another post as soon as I have them ready.

It is well past time for an update to my form fillable character sheets. (You can find that version HERE.) They are in need of several minor changes and fixes but they have always had a couple of major flaws that the new ones are addressing. The biggest problem is that they have a single sheet for all spellcasters to use for tracking their spells. In trying to handle all classes it doesn’t do a very good job for any specific class. Also, each different class has different things that need to be tracked (such as KI points for Monks or Rages for Barbarians). The other problem is that it doesn’t handle multiclass characters well.
To fix those problems and others I am in the process of creating a separate character sheet for each character class and another one for multiclass characters.

I will be creating a new “Filling in the 5E Character Sheet Box by Box” post for the new character sheets (you can find the existing one HERE.) In the mean time, if you are going to be trying out the Cleric sheet, here are a few changes you need to know about:

  1.    You can’t enter your characters speed directly on page 1. You must go to page 2 and enter the base speed under “Race”. This speed will be displayed in the box labelled “speed” on page 1. Under that box is a grey rectangle where you can enter any adjustments to the base speed.
  2.     Also page 2 is where you do your armor class calculations. Put a check by No Armor, Light Armor, Medium Armor or Heavy Armor and enter the armor class adjustment that your specific armor provides. Your base Armor Class will be calculated. If you are using a shield, put a check there and your shield will be added to the total armor class. That will be shown on page 1. Under the shield you can list a couple of protective items and their boost to your armor class. These will also be added to the AC that shows on page 1. On each type of armor (or no armor) you can add any magical or miscellaneous adjustments.
  3.     I have added a grey rectangle beside each ability’s saving throw where you can enter modifiers that will be applied to those.
  4.     I darkened the grey ability names (STR, Dex, etc.) so they could be more easily read and added a grey rectangle next to them where modifiers could be added at Proficiencies, Passive Perception and Initiative modifier.
  5.     I added a place to enter your current Initiative next to Inspiration. Don’t confuse this with the box labelled Initiative that is next to the box for speed. That box is for your Initiative modifier.
  6.     I added a permanent “coin purse” to the “Other Equipment” list. This will calculate the weight of all of the coins you enter in the “Treasure” box. 50 coins = 1 pound.
  7.     I added a check box (actually a circle) for each line of equipment. Only items that are checked will be used to calculate the “Total Weight Carried”. That should make it easier to track items you have but are not carrying, or perhaps they are inside a bag of holding.
  8.    The biggest change is on Page 4. This page will be different for each Class. It will calculate Spell Slots, Cantrips Known, Spells Prepared, Spell Save DC, Spell Attack Modifier and other things for other classes. I am no longer trying to provide room for spell descriptions. These are best handled with spell cards, or in some cases a printed spell book (refer to my posts HERE and HERE.) I have tried to leave enough room for more than just the spell name. What I would do is enter a symbol to indicate if the spell is (C) concentration, (R) ritual, or sometimes (T) casting time. There is also room to indicate which book the spell is found in if it isn’t from the PHB. For the Cleric and some others, when you get to higher levels there may not be enough room to list all available spells, but there should be enough room to list all of the spells you might want to use. Please let me know if this becomes a problem.

For those of you who are interested, please give this a hard palytest. Try to break it. Let me know if something doesn’t work, needs improvement or if you just have a question. Thank you.

I will try to get the rest of these finished and posted as quickly as I can.

D&D 5E – Adding new characters to the Party

This is an expansion to a previous post. You may want to first read [D&D 5E – Creating the Party] before trying to make any sense out of this.

If you are using my “Creating the Party” rules to create your party, what if a new player joins the group?

The process will be similar to “Creating the Party” rules, but the other players will suggest his role and relationships.

NEW PLAYER

The new player selects preferred Race and Class. Then all of the existing players have input regarding his role in the group and his relationships with the existing PCs.

First, have each of the existing players describe his character, its role in the group, its relationship with the other characters and its conflicts.

1) Role

The group decides what role they would like for the new Player Character to assume in the party. If the new player would prefer to take on a different role then it is discussed and a mutually acceptable role will be agreed upon. The new player can change his selection of Race and/or Class at this time if he chooses to. He should also choose his character’s name.

2) PC’s relationships

The DM will ask for one of the existing players to come up with a relationship that his Character has with this new Character. If no one volunteers, the DM will randomly select someone. The group can all chime in with suggestions. It is okay if more than one existing Character has a relationship with this new Character.

3) Conflicts

If you are using this optional rule then, as with relationships, the DM asks for some player to come up with some trait or something from the new character’s past that his Character is uncomfortable with. Again, if the new player objects then it is discussed among the group until an agreeable conflict is selected. As with relationships – additional conflicts are okay.

4) Roll-up the character

Like everyone else did, using the role, relationships and conflicts as a guide for abilities and background.

REPLACEMENT CHARACTERS

If an existing player needs to roll-up a replacement character (if for instance his original character died), use the same process listed above, but allow that player to select a role, a relationship or two, and a conflict or two.
Because the player has been playing with the group, he already knows the relationships and conflicts that exist within the group so he can create a new character that can fit in well. Of course, encourage group discussion of his suggestions and allow the other players to suggest different options.

FINAL NOTE

Refer to [D&D 5E – Creating the Party] for examples of Character Roles, Character Relationships and Objectionable Character Traits or Past actions.

The Player of this new Character can object to any of the other player’s suggestions and make counter suggestions of his own. The DM has final approval. Try to remember that this new Character must be fun for the player to play, if he has strong feelings for or against anything the others may want, you should typically allow his wishes to prevail – within reason.

D&D 5E – Creating the Party

How do the PCs Come Together and Stay Together?

After watching this video “The coming revolution in role-play games? ” I started thinking that, when I begin a new Fifth Edition Dungeon and Dragons game I could do my character creation in a similar method. The reason that I might want to do this is that in many games the PCs don’t seem to have any good reason to be together, much else to function as a group. I have tried different things to encourage this, but borrowing some ideas from “Hillfolk” (a DramaSystem game) might work out well.

 The idea behind DramaSystem is to build a varied and nuanced character with connections to other characters. This is not the sort of game that you go into with a preconceived notion of your character. Your character will change as you intuit the group’s overall build and decide that you would fit better in a different way. Then play takes place as a series of scenes. Each scene is determined by a player and may or may not include all of the other players. As you see, this is definitely not D&D.

 DramaSystem is a true “role playing game”. D&D says that it is a role playing game, but it is primarily a “fight the monsters, get the treasure, save the world and get out alive” kind of game. I have no desire to turn it into an “explore your character’s true motivations and come to grips with your inner conflicts” kind of game. That being said, it wouldn’t hurt to start the game with the PCs having closer relationships with one another. So I borrowed heavily from DramaSystem to come up with this idea for running a session zero.

 What is a Session Zero?

This is simply getting the group together before the first gaming session to roll characters together and talk about what kind of game it will be. It is not required and many DMs skip it altogether, or simply include it at the beginning of the first session.

Session zero usually involves the group meeting to discuss and establish the following.

  • Game rules set to be played
  • Table rules (table etiquette, behavior expectations, bringing up topics that players feel uncomfortable with, etc)
  • House rules (changes from the core rules set, home-brew material, etc)
  • Campaign expectations (Do we want to play an intrigue campaign? Dungeon crawler? An epic campaign?)
  • Setting
  • Character creation

What I am suggesting here only addresses the last bullet point, Character creation.

 Running Session Zero

Here is how I suggest that you as the DM might run a session zero.

The players may want to decide on their character’s race and class beforehand but otherwise they should not create their characters before they come to session zero.

You should start by describing the Campaign that you have in mind. Among the things you should explain to the players will be the level of magic and the overall theme of the campaign. Will it be mostly Gothic horror, nautical adventures, airships, a traditional dungeon crawl, or what? Then tell the players that they already know each other and have come together to form an adventuring party to rid the world of evil (or to explore ancient dungeons and get rich, or to find out what is causing all of the cattle to die, or to rescue the princess, or whatever the overarching theme is for your campaign).

 1) PC’s Roles

Read aloud to the players, or paraphrase everything in maroon below, starting with:

You are not only creating your individual characters, but also their relationships with each other in order to create a group that can better function as a team. As you develop your PC each other player will build on that to develop his PC.

Have each player roll a d20. This will be a special initiative roll, but with no modifiers. Let ties be resolved by another roll between the tied players.

In initiative order describe your character including name, race, sex, class and what role your character will play in the group. Feel free to ask other players for ideas or suggestions. You should stop at that and not describe your character any further at this time. Specifically, you should not give your character any background information. That will come later. [Some examples of possible character roles are listed at the end of this page.]

Group participation is encouraged. By default, the first character to select a role to take in the group should get it, however if two characters both want to fill the same role, the other players can chime in and you can work it out as a group to everyone’s satisfaction.

If you are sitting around a battlemat; Write your character’s name in front of you on the mat, in large letters so everyone can see.

 2) PC’s relationships.

Still in initiative order, explain your character’s relationship to one of the other characters of your choice. If possible, you should select a character that has not yet been selected, and that hasn’t selected you. How do you know that character? How did you meet? How long have you known each other? Tell us of some interesting event in your past that the two of you shared. [Some examples of possible character relationships are listed at the end of this page.]

We are just making stuff up here. The story you are telling about your character’s past is also helping to define the background of other characters in the group. If another player objects to what you say about his character’s background, he will say why he objects and suggest an alternative story. The group will decide what story they like best. I (the DM) will be the final arbitrator and can veto any story that I feel doesn’t fit into the campaign that I have in mind.

If you are sitting around a battlemat; Draw a line connecting your character’s name to the name of the character that you have a relationship with. Write a word or two along the line as a reminder to everyone as to what that relationship is.

If every character has a relationship with every other character or has a relationship with someone that does, you can continue on to step 3. In other words, if you can trace a path from everyone to everyone else that connects directly or goes through no more than one other character. If not, repeat step 2. Only add; This time you can select any other character that you want. It is okay if some characters are picked more than others.

 3) PC’s Conflicts [Optional]

After step 2, you can quit this and have everyone finish creating his or her character as you normally would. Or for a little more interaction between PCs, continue on with this final step.

Re-roll initiative.

On your turn in the new initiative order, select someone else’s character. This does not have to be a character that you have a relationship with. Come up with one thing that your character doesn’t like about that character, or that makes your character uneasy. This can be something that he has done in the past, or some mannerism or personality trait. [Some examples are listed at the end of this page.]

Again, if the other character’s player objects, the group gets to decide if this would be fun for the group and the DM gets the final verdict.

 4) Roll-up the characters

Have everyone roll-up his character as you normally would, but they should use the partial background just created as a jumping off place to assign ability scores and to fill in their character’s background. If there are backgrounds in the Player’s Handbook (PHB) that fit with what was discussed, he can choose one of those. If not, work with him to create a background that is unique to his character. Refer to “Customizing A Background” on page 126 of the PHB.

 5) Play D&D


The idea here is to produce a Player Character Party where the individual members know each other better. Hopefully it will result in more personal interaction and cooperation between PCs than the typical “My character is an orphan. I just met these other guys. I couldn’t care less about them. I just thought I would have a better chance to survive if I wasn’t alone.”

EXAMPLES of CHARACTER ROLES

Some examples of what your character’s role in the group might be include:

the blaster
the brains
the comic
the communicator
the dealer with undead
the guide
the healer
the hunter
the leader
the magical blaster
the magical buffer
the moral compass
the protector
the ranged support
the scout
the skill monkey
the sneak
the spell caster
the tactician
the talker
the tank
the thief
the trap finder

EXAMPLES of CHARACTER RELATIONSHIPS

This can be a family relationship such as wife, husband, father, mother, son, daughter, brother, sister, cousin, etc. Or it can be a longtime friend. Some examples using the name “Fred” as the PC you have a relationship with:

“I am from a large family. We lived just outside of a large city (the DM can insert the name of a big city here). When I was just a lad, we were attacked by goblins and they almost wiped out my entire family. My brother Fred and I were the only survivors.”

“I met Fred when I as a temple guard. He was a raw recruit and I taught him everything I know about enforcing the law.”

“Fred is several years older than I am. He caught me stealing fruit off an apple cart. He took me in and taught me everything I know about being a thief in the big city.”

“Fred and I just happened to be at the same bar when we were both impressed into the navy. We served on the same ship for three years and became fast friends.”

EXAMPLES of OBJECTIONABLE CHARACTER TRAITS or PAST ACTIONS

I don’t like the way he:

Looks down on people that are of a higher (or lower) class than he is.
Laughs.
Snores.
Looks at me.
Thinks he is smarter than everyone else.
Eats his food.
Is never around when there is work to be done.
Smells.
Treats (one of the PC’s).
Drinks too much.
Eats too much.
Is always primping.
Is always daydreaming.
Can never sit still.
Is always sharpening his weapon.
Talks too much.

He once:

Stole something from me.
Beat me in a contest.
Saved my life.
Stole the love of my life.
Played a practical joke on me.
Watched while I almost died.
Wouldn’t share his food when I was starving.
Borrowed money from me and has never paid his debt.
Broke my heart.
Nearly killed me.
Saved someone I love.

Whatever trait you choose, fill in some specific details like who, what, when and where?

D&D 5E – Character Creation Sheet

Character CreationCharacter Creation Cheat Sheet

Download your free pdf copy here.

I found this great character creation help sheet on line. It is poster sized, so I modified it into a 5 page PDF file that will be more useful at the gaming table.

Does anyone know who the original author of this is? I would like to thank him or her and give them credit. This is NOT my original work.

Favorite Race / Class ?

race-class

What is your Favorite PC Race / Class ?

Last October I posted set of pre-made first level character sheets – one each for every Race/Class combination (you can access that post here). I thought it would be interesting to see how many of each have been downloaded. This is very nu-scientific, but I think it is a good indication of winch combinations are the most popular.

Any comments?

human_fighter.pdf 522
elf_ranger.pdf 438
human_paladin.pdf 391
human_cleric.pdf 382
human_ranger.pdf 353
dwarf_cleric.pdf 341
dragonborn_paladin.pdf 325
human_rogue.pdf 324
dwarf_fighter.pdf 313
human_wizard.pdf 310
elf_wizard.pdf 295
human_bard.pdf 293
human_monk.pdf 292
dragonborn_barbarian.pdf 287
halfling_rogue.pdf 282
dragonborn_fighter.pdf 281
elf_rogue.pdf 255
dwarf_barbarian.pdf 254
elf_druid.pdf 251
human_warkock.pdf 244
half-orc_barbarian.pdf 242
human_sorcerer.pdf 211
dwarf_paladin.pdf 194
tiefling_warlock.pdf 190
elf_cleric.pdf 182
human_druid.pdf 176
dragonborn_sorcerer.pdf 174
half-elf_ranger.pdf 174
elf_monk.pdf 165
gnome_wizard.pdf 158
half-elf_bard.pdf 153
elf_fighter.pdf 153
elf_sorcerer.pdf 151
dragonborn_warlock.pdf 142
elf_warlock.pdf 141
elf_bard.pdf 139
dwarf_ranger.pdf 138
dragonborn_monk.pdf 138
halfling_bard.pdf 137
tiefling_rogue.pdf 136
elf-sheet-front.pdf 136
human-sheet-front.pdf 135
dragonborn_cleric.pdf 135
half-orc_fighter.pdf 126
half-elf_rogue.pdf 125
dragonborn_wizard.pdf 124
gnome_rogue.pdf 123
elf_barbarian.pdf 122
elf_paladin.pdf 119
dragonborn_druid.pdf 118
dragonborn_ranger.pdf 116
halfling_barbarian.pdf 112
half-elf_warlock.pdf 107
dragonborn_rogue.pdf 106
gnome_barbarian.pdf 105
tiefling_sorcerer.pdf 105
dwarf_monk.pdf 104
half-elf_sorcerer.pdf 102
dwarf_rogue.pdf 101
dwarf_bard.pdf 99
dwarf_wizard.pdf 99
half-elf_cleric.pdf 99
dragonborn_bard.pdf 99
halfling_ranger.pdf 97
half-elf_paladin.pdf 96
half-orc-sheet-front.pdf 96
gnome_warlock.pdf 96
half-elf_druid.pdf 95
half-elf-sheet-front.pdf 95
gnome_sorcerer.pdf 93
dwarf_druid.pdf 93
human-sheet-back.pdf 92
gnome_druid.pdf 91
dwarf_warkock.pdf 91
halfling_cleric.pdf 90
half-elf_wizard.pdf 90
tiefling_bard.pdf 89
halfling_monk.pdf 87
gnome_bard.pdf 86
gnome_cleric.pdf 86
gnome_ranger.pdf 86
tiefling_druid.pdf 85
tiefling_barbarian.pdf 84
tiefling_paladin.pdf 84
dwarf_sorcerer.pdf 81
gnome_monk.pdf 80
halfling_fighter.pdf 75
tiefling_wizard.pdf 75
halfling_wizard.pdf 74
halfling_paladin.pdf 74
halfling_druid.pdf 74
half-orc_paladin.pdf 74
half-elf_monk.pdf 72
tiefling_monk.pdf 72
halfling_warlock.pdf 72
half-elf_fighter.pdf 70
tiefling_cleric.pdf 70
halfling_sorcerer.pdf 67
gnome_paladin.pdf 66
tiefling_fighter.pdf 65
gnome_fighter.pdf 63
half-orc_ranger.pdf 63
tiefling_ranger.pdf 62
half-orc_rogue.pdf 62
half-orc_wizard.pdf 56
half-elf_barbarian.pdf 53
half-orc_monk.pdf 53
half-orc_cleric.pdf 53
half-orc_warlock.pdf 52
half-orc_druid.pdf 50
half-orc_bard.pdf 48
half-orc_sorcerer.pdf 45

//

Character Sheet Fixed

DogsPlayingDnD

Corrected D&D 5E Auto-fill Character Sheet now available

You can download it here 5-0-character-sheet-rrh-fillable-rev4d.pdf

UPDATE: The character sheets on this page are an older version. For the most recent auto-calculate Character Sheets click HERE.