Dungeon Master Assistance

A place to share thoughts and ideas about Dungeons and Dragons

D&D 5E – Encounter Size Tables

Tables for Determining Encounter Size

This is for Dungeon Masters. I created it a few months ago and have found it very useful when creating encounters for my 5th Edition Dungeons and Dragons games. Using guidelines found in the Dungeon Master’s Guide I worked on the math to come up with simple tables that I could reference to make the encounter neither too hard nor too easy for my Player Characters.

There are separate tables for 3, 4, 5, or 6 characters of any level (1 through 20). Just find the table for the number of PCs – their average character level – and if you want it to be an easy, medium, hard or deadly encounter. There is also an “Any Level” encounter table if you want to use that. Then read across the table to find how many monsters you will need based on the monsters challenge rating (CR).

This makes for a lot of tables. Each of these single page PDF files has a separate table for Any Level encounters, Easy encounters, Medium encounters, Hard encounters, and Deadly encounters.

PC Levels 1-5 for 3 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 1-5 for 4 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 1-5 for 5 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 1-5 for 6 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 6-10 for 3 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 6-10 for 4 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 6-10 for 5 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 6-10 for 6 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 11-15 for 3 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 11-15 for 4 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 11-15 for 5 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 11-15 for 6 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 16-20 for 3 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 16-20 for 4 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 16-20 for 5 characters: Download HERE
PC Levels 16-20 for 6 characters: Download HERE

There is also a single PDF file that contains all of the above: Download HERE

If you find these useful let me know.
Enjoy!

D&D 5E – Character Sheet with Dice Rolling

5E – Dice Rolling Character Sheets

The pandemic has made a change to the way I am running D&D games. Running a virtual game of Dungeons and Dragons made me realize how useful it would be if your Player’s Character Sheet would roll your the dice for you. So I took my Character Sheets (you can find then HERE) and figured a way to to add dice rolling. These are my results..

Download a sheet by clicking on the underlined word.

DICE ROLLING Character Sheets: For each class there is a 4 page character sheet: Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard
Class Feature Sheets: These are the same feature sheets that are available on my previous Character Sheets post, repeated here for your convenience. Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard
Simple DICE ROLLING Character Sheet:This is a 2 page character sheet if you don’t need the class information: download it  HERE
Multi-class DICE ROLLING Character Sheet:This has 4 general pages plus an additional 12 pages – one for each class in the Player’s Handbook: download it HERE

Magic Item Record Sheet: The character sheets may not provide enough space to track all of your character’s magic items. If your character requires more space than available on this one page simply copy the file under a different name for each page required. You can scroll the text if the magic item description is too long to fit in the box. If you intend to print the page you should abbreviate long descriptions to fit in a single box, or split the description across two or more boxes. download it HERE

Using the Dice Rollers

I tried several free PDF viewers, and the one that works best with these is Adobe Reader. I recommend you download your Character Sheet and use Adobe Reader to fill it out.

Box by box instructions for filling in the Character Sheets can be found HERE. The only difference is that on these sheets clicking on any red text will generate and display a dice roll.

On the upper right corner of each page there is spot that looks like this  #____   Previously, this is where you could put a version number if you had multiple versions of the same sheet. This has been re-purposed to display the results of any dice roll you may indicate just below that line. For example if you enter 4d12+6 and then click on the red = sign it will roll four 12 sided dice, add them together and add 6 to the total. Above the line it will display the results of that roll. Above that it will show the result of each die rolled. This same space on page 1 is also used to display the results of an ability check, a saving throw, a skill check, or an initiative check. The results of an initiative check will also be displayed in the initiative box. You can override the number in the initiative box by typing in a different number if need be.

The attack bonus box for each weapon will now roll 1d20 and add the attack bonus to the roll. It displays the result of the roll in the same box. There is also an ADV (advantage) and a DIS (disadvantage) box that you can check to roll 2d20 and pick the highest (for advantage) or lowest (for disadvantage) of the two before adding the attack bonus. If a natural 1 is rolled (for advantage two natural 1s must be rolled) it will display MISS in red letters. If a natural 20 is rolled (for disadvantage two natural 20s must rolled) it will display HIT in green letters and will check the CRIT box.

The damage box for each weapon will now roll the indicated number of dice of the indicated size and add the indicated bonus. It displays the result of the roll in the same box. It also shows the results of each individual die roll. If the CRIT (critiacl hit) box is checked the number of dice rolled will be doubled.

For spellcasting characters, clicking on the spell attack modifier (on page 4) will make a spell attack roll and display the results of that roll on the #____ line at the top of that page.

D&D 5E – Magic Item Record Sheet

I have come to realise that my character record sheets (HERE) do not provide enough space to track all of the magic items your character may acquire during your campaign. Rather than adding this sheet to those character record sheets, I am providing this sheet as a separate download. If your character requires more space than available on this page simply copy the file under a different name for each page required.

This is a form-fallible Magic Item Record Sheet for keeping a list with descriptions of your Dungeons and Dragons player character’s magic items.

This was created for use on your monitor during play; you can scroll the text if the magic item description is too long to fit in the box. If you intend to print the page you should abbreviate long descriptions to fit in a single box, or split the description across two or more boxes.

Enjoy!

D&D 5E – Pre-made Character Sheets

I just discovered this great resource from the Digital Dungenmaster. He has made available Pre-made Character Sheets for levels 1-20, every class and every archetype.

You can find them HERE.

D&D 5E – Starting Equipment

What equipment do I start with?

Many that are new to this game find equipping their character to be difficult. Even using an on-line tool such as “D&D Beyond” can be confusing.

It’s really fairly simple. First you must choose a class and a background for your character. Here is an example using the 5E version of the Player’s Hand Book to equip a Cleric with an Acolyte background:

-EITHER-
If you want to simply use the standard equipment do this:
1) Go to the “Class Features” section for your chosen class (“Cleric” in this example is on page 57). Look under “Equipment” in this section to find your list of starting equipment.
2) Then go to the section for the background that you have chosen (“Acolyte” in this example is on page 127). Look under “Equipment” in this section to find a list of the rest of your equipment and starting gold pieces.

-OR-
If you would rather select all of your own equipment you can do this:
1) Go to the “STARTING WEALTH BY CLASS” table (on page 143) to determine your starting gold. For a cleric it reads 5d4 x 10gp. You simply roll five 4 sided dice, add the result together and multiply by 10.
2) Go shopping! Using the tables for “Armor”(p. 145), “Weapons”(p. 149), “Adventuring Gear”(p. 150) and “Tools”(p. 154). You can equip your character using your starting gold to purchase what you like. You will not likely want to buy a mount or other animal, tack, harness, drawn vehicle, or any trade goods – but if you do there are tables with prices listed for those as well.

-OR-
If if you want me to do it for you:
1) Go to my post HERE
2) Download a Ready-To-Play first level character sheet for whichever race and class you want to play. If you don’t want to use my sheet, you can just reference the equipment on page 2 to use on your preferred character sheet.

Now your character is equipped to start his first adventure!

D&D 5E – 3D Distances Table

How to easily determine the distance between points in 3D space.

“My character is 50 feet away from the base of a 60 foot cliff and firing my shortbow (range 80/320). How far away is the target standing on top of the cliff? Do I have to roll at disadvantage or is it still short range?”
“I have a fly speed of 60 feet. My opponent is flying 45 feet away (as measured on the battlemat) and is also 25 feet higher than me. Can I fly to within 5 foot of him on my turn?”

I have been using a simple technique to quickly determine the distance at my table. First I determine the horizontal distance and the vertical distance. Take 1/2 the shorter of the two (rounded down) and add it to the longer. When all of these distances are in 5 foot increments and the distances are less than 50 feet it works fairly well, but it obviously has its limitations.

Another option is to use the Pythagorean theorem, but my math isn’t all that good.

You could have a calculator at the table. One with trig functions would be useful.

Some people keep a link to a Pythagorean Theorem Calculator website on their device. Here is a good one:
https://www.omnicalculator.com/math/pythagorean-theorem

I decided that the easiest way for me would be to have a simple look-up table printed out and available at the table when we played, so I created this one.

Download your free copy HERE

D&D 5E – Simplified Rules

5.0-EZ Version 6

Download your free copy here.

This version contains several minor corrections to the previous version.

This is a supplement to fifth edition dungeons and dragons for those who prefer simpler rules or want an easy way to introduce the game to new players.

If you sometimes feel that the fifth edition Dungeons and Dragons rules are too complicated, this is for you. I created this set of house rules to simplify character creation and advancement among other things. It also introduces a whole new way to select and track the casting of magic spells.
One thing I tried very hard to do was keep the characters levels and power as close as possible to the Player’s Handbook characters so that if you play using these rules, you can still use published 5th edition adventures, and the monsters will require little or no modifications

 

 

D&D 5E – Multiclass Spell Slot Calculator

I ran across this excellent spell slot calculator and felt like I had to share it. I don’t know who created it, if anyone knows, please let me know so I can thank them give them credit.

The link to the site is HERE

D&D 5E – Races

To the best of my knowledge, the list below contains all the official races for fifth edition dungeons and dragons (as of June 3, 2020). There are several Plane Shift and Unearthed Acana (UA) Player Races, buy I have not included these because they are not considered official fifth edition content.

These are the books where the races can be found:

Acquisitions Incorporated (AI),  Dungeon Master’s Guide  (DMG), Eberron: Rising from the Last War (ERftLW), Elemental Evil Player’s Companion (EEPC), Guildmaster’s Guide to Ravnica (GGtR), Locathah Rising (LR), Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes (MToF), Mythic Odesseys of Theros (MOoT), One Grung Above (OGA), Player’s Handbook (PHB), Princes of the Apocalypse (PotA), Sword Coast Adventurer’s Guide (SCAG), The Tortle Package (TP), Volo’s Guide to Monsters (VGtM), Wayfinder’s Guide to Eberron (WGtE)

  • Aarakocra (EEPC)
  • Aasimar: Basic (DMG)
  • Aasimar: Protector, Scourge, Fallen (VGtM)
  • Bugbear (VGtM) , (ERftLW)
  • Centaur (GGtR),  (MOoT)
  • Changeling (ERftLW), (WGtE)
  • Deep Gnome/Svirfneblin  (EEPC), (SCAG), (MToF)
  • Dragonborn (PHB)
  • Dwarf: Duergar (SCAG), (MToF)
  • Dwarf: Mountain or Hill (PHB)
  • Elf: Eladrin, Sea Elf, or Shadar-kai (MToF)
  • Elf: High, Wood, or Drow (PHB)
  • Firbolg (VGtM)
  • Genasi (PotA), (EEPC)
  • Gith: Githyanki or Githzerai (MToF)
  • Gnome (PHB)
  • Goblin (VGtM), (GGtR), (ERftLW)
  • Goliath (VGtM), (EEPC)
  • Grung (OGA)
  • Half-Elf (PHB)
  • Half-Elf: Variant (SCAG)
  • Halfling: Ghostwise (SCAG)
  • Halfling: Lightfoot or Stout (PHB)
  • Half-Orc (PHB)
  • Hobgoblin (VGtM), (ERftLW)
  • Human: standard or variant (PHB)
  • Kalashtar (ERftLW), (WGtE)
  • Kenku (VGtM)
  • Kobold (VGtM)
  • Leonin (MOoT)
  • Lizardfolk (VGtM)
  • Locathah (LR)
  • Loxodon (GGtR)
  • Minotaur (GGtR), (MOoT)
  • Orc (VGtM)
  • Orc: Eberron (ERftLW)
  • Satyr (MOoT)
  • Shifter (ERftLW), (WGtE)
  • Simic Hybrid (GGtR)
  • Tabaxi (VGtM)
  • Tiefling (PHB)
  • Tiefling: Bloodline Variants (MToF)
  • Tiefling: Winged Variant (SCAG)
  • Tortle (TP)
  • Triton (VGtM)
  • Verdan (AI)
  • Warforged (ERftLW), (WGtE)
  • Yuan-Ti: Pureblood (VGtM)

D&D 5E – Quick Play Character Sheets – rev. 8

Races

Ready-To-Play First Level Character Sheets

If you want a ready-to-play first level character for fifth edition dungeons and dragons, simply select your character sheet below. Pick the race and class you want, download the filled-in character sheet and you will be ready to play.

This is an update to the Quick Play Character Sheets I posted in 2014 (find them HERE). I completely overhauled them, primarily by putting them onto the latest version of my form-fallible character sheets (find them HERE). While I was at it I corrected mistakes and added more information. I also gave each character a name, added the Artificer class and added a character sketch (from images I found freely on the internet – I make no claim to them).

I used the suggested quick build from the Player’s Handbook as a guide to fill in the information.

You can change any of the information and continue to use the sheet as your character advances in level. You can find box-by-box instructions HERE.

Changing the level will only update the next level XP goal, the proficiency bonus and all of the fields that are effected by the changed proficiency bonus. You will have to make all other adjustments that may be needed for the new, higher level character.

I used the standard array [15, 14, 13, 12, 10, and 8] for ability scores. I placed the first two scores in the abilities as suggested in the Player’s Handbook for the quick build for the class, and I put the others where I thought best for the class. I then adjusted them based on the character’s race.

For all the rest of the information, I used my best judgment to create what I thought would be a “typical” build for each race and class.

 

Dragonborn:

Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard

 

Dwarf

Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard

 

Elf

Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard

 

Gnome

Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard

 

Half-Elf

Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard

 

Halfling

Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard

 

Half-Orc

Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard

 

Human

Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard

 

Tiefling

Artificer, Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, Wizard

Enjoy.